Nous sommes actuellement le sam. août 17, 2019 16:24 pm

Le fuseau horaire est réglé sur UTC+01:00




Publier un nouveau sujet  Répondre au sujet  [ 35 messages ]  Atteindre la page Précédent 1 2 3 Suivant
Auteur Message
MessagePublié : mer. avr. 08, 2015 9:19 am 
Hors-ligne
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : sam. janv. 19, 2013 16:40 pm
Messages : 62
Bonjour,

Les dernières infos trouvées:

ci dessous une partie du War Diary: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, Jan - Dec 1944

1944 September 1
0630 hours
Battalion 'O' Group.
Own troops: The Corps plan is to cut the ARRAS - ST. POL road by getting 5th BRIGADE up on to the high ground by AUTOVAN and 29th BRIGADE on their left around CROSS ROADS 3307.
Enemy: Little is known of the enemy moves, but no strong opposition is expected.
Intelligence: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will attack and capture ARRAS.
Method: The BRIGADE plane is to be carried out in five stages.
(1) HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT cross the SOMME and make straight for the BRIGADE objective.
(2) No. 1 Company of 1st Motor Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS and No. 1 Squadron of 1st Armoured GRENADIER GUARDS take up a position so as to contain ALBERT which is strongly held by the enemy
(3 ) 2nd Recce Battalion WELSH GUARDS followed by the remainder of the GRENADIER GROUP and two Batteries of 153 Field Regiment ROYAL ARTILLERY make straight for the BRIGADE objective and take over from HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT.
(4) COLDSTREAM GROUP with Battery 153 Field Regiment ROYAL ARTILLERY and Q Battery 21st Anti-Tank capture ARRAS.
(5) BRIGADE H.Q. followed by 2nd Armoured Battalion IRISH GAURDS move up to objective.
The COLDSTREAM GROUP under the command of the Commanding Officer move as soon as the Centre Line is clear in the following order:-
1st Armoured Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS and Q Battery, Advance Battalion H.Q., No. 3 Company, No. 4 Company, Support Company, F.2.
No. 2 Company is to remain behind and guards the bridges over the SOMME till relieved by 32nd BRIGADE when the will rejoin the Battalion.
The Centre Line runs: -
CROSS ROADS 251643; HEDAUVILLE 3274; AYETTE 4487; BEAMETZ 3695; WARZUS 3799, ARRAS.
Before entering ARRAS the Companies will form up as follows:-
No. 1 Company at BERNEVILLE objective in ARRAS the RUE ST HUBERT and the bridges beyond.
No. 3 Company at BEAURAINS objective in ARRAS the Railway Station.
No. 4 Company and Battalion H.Q. will enter ARRAS by whichever way meets least opposition.
The Battalion moved off behind the 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS at 1100 hours.
Enemy were reported to be resisting strongly in ALBERT but there was a clear run along the Centre Line except for one point under fire from an enemy mortar and by 1300 hours the 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS reported back that they intended to go straight into ARRAS from the South, and the Commanding Officer ordered the leading Company to turn off the Centre Line and follow them in.
At 1415 hours the Battalion halted so as to get the column closed up and organised ready to enter the town as soon as the tanks were safely in.
The Commanding Officer then went forward to the 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS H.Q.
There was a certain amount of resistance and sniping from houses, but this was soon dealt with and from a joint H.Q. set up at the Station No. 1 Company was ordered to debus and move on to its objective on foot.
By 1500 hours the firing had stopped and No.s 3 and 4 Companies drove in in their T.C.L.s, followed by No. 2 Company which had caught up the Battalion column and was given the tasks of round up and guarding the numerous prisoners captured.
At 1550 hours orders were received for the COLDSTREAM Group to move on up to ECURIE and join the rest of the BRIGADE, leaving No. 3 Company behind in ARRAS, till relieved by the 2nd Battalion IRISH GUARDS.
By 1700 hours the Battalion was established up on the ECURIE feature, where no enemy opposition was met with, though a considerable number of Germans came and surrendered, just in time to be bombed by an enemy aircraft.
1700 hours
The Commanding Officer gave out orders for the consolidation of the position as follows:-
No. 2 Company CROSSROADS 465037;
No. 4 Company CROSSROADS 473035;
No. 1 Company CROSSROADS 460035;
Battalion H.Q. on the ROAD at 465030.
The Battalion is to remain here for the night while the 2nd Armoured Battalion IRISH GUARDS with No. 3 Company under command go on to DOUAI.
During the day a total of 1,300 Prisoners were collected in ARRAS, the Battalion’s contribution including the R.T.O. of ARRAS, S.S. Troops, G.A.F. Troops, several Mongolians, and a great variety of Infantry Regiments.
1830 hours
2nd Armoured Battalion IRISH GUARDS and No. 3 Company were reported to have cleared DOUAI, though some opposition was met with, and No. 3 Company had some casualties.

SOURCE: WW2Talk

et une petite carte très interessante:

Image

SOURCE:INTERNET

Cordialement

Mathieu

_________________
Facebook SOMME & BRESLE BATTLE
https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=317693001744575&ref=bookmark


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mer. avr. 08, 2015 18:14 pm 
Hors-ligne
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : ven. sept. 28, 2007 11:41 am
Messages : 1410
Localisation : St Leu d'Esserent
Bonjour, beaux documents, merci amicalement jph


Haut
   
MessagePublié : lun. nov. 02, 2015 14:13 pm 
Hors-ligne
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : mar. oct. 20, 2015 14:14 pm
Messages : 7
This is an article from a local newspaper reporting on the reception held for my father, Guardsman Norman Lund, by the mayor of the village of Bonnay. My father spent a week in the village recovering after his Sherman Tank was destroyed by a sea mine dug into the road whilst approaching Albert. His tank commander was Lieutenant Stirton who lost an eye after being hit by shrapnel. My father and the rest of his crew walked back to Bonnay where three Sherman tanks had been destroyed the previous day by a German 88 gun. Guardsmen Ted Sault and Joe Bryant were killed. The people of Bonnay made us very welcome. It was one of the greatest days in the life of my late father.


Pièces jointes :
Scan.jpeg
Scan.jpeg [ 2.95 Mio | Consulté 2100 fois ]
Haut
   
MessagePublié : lun. nov. 02, 2015 20:32 pm 
Hors-ligne
Site Admin
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : jeu. sept. 27, 2007 21:28 pm
Messages : 3330
Welcome on our forum & website Wayne ! :wink:

Glad to read that this moment was a great day for your Father and the memory of all these men.

Maybe, you could help us. Have you some documents or photos of the war time of your father and his unit, that we could put on our website.

Hope to read you another time.

Best regards

Fred

_________________
Frédéric - co-administrateur du site et forum "Picardie 1939 - 1945"
Président association "Picardie 1939 - 1945"


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mar. nov. 03, 2015 16:53 pm 
Hors-ligne

Inscription : dim. sept. 16, 2012 10:06 am
Messages : 164
Bonjour Wayne, hi Wayne.
Welcome in the forum, as Frédéric says.
I thanks your specially for this message on the website.
I leave next from this village.
A great friend (small at this time) have spend joyfully time in the tank just after the battle. The delicious "war game" for many childrens after the war...
They played with all the ammunition in the passenger stained by these painful bouts.
I'know were the fight have become and the position of this 88mm gun. I thank you for the description of the fight because i don't find a history of this evennement and the tank type. I've go to the near first war cemetery recently and there wasn't sadly ww2 graves.
I have see recently a photo of one tank enter in Corbie city. Perhaps it's your father tank... ?
The big evennement was the discovery of a lot of photos of this date by a joung witness teenager in vacancy in Bonnay. But, unfortunately i don't have the authorization for diffuse this original documents.
After the time he don't remember the fighting tanks on the road near from the Bonnay exit.
I will contact this older man now for looking in the photos (he spend just 1 day in the 2 village with his camera).
May be your father was in this pictures...

Just one detail of the régiment in a jeep comming from Bonnay.

Image

Sorry for the bad english :-(


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mar. nov. 03, 2015 18:46 pm 
Hors-ligne
Site Admin
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : jeu. sept. 27, 2007 21:28 pm
Messages : 3330
somme40 a écrit :
...But, unfortunately i don't have the authorization for diffuse this original documents.
After the time he don't remember the fighting tanks on the road near from the Bonnay exit.
I will contact this older man now for looking in the photos (he spend just 1 day in the 2 village with his camera).
May be your father was in this pictures...


Cela serait sympathique pour Wayne ... et pour nous tous ... de voir en effet quelques photos. :wink:

_________________
Frédéric - co-administrateur du site et forum "Picardie 1939 - 1945"
Président association "Picardie 1939 - 1945"


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mer. nov. 04, 2015 5:01 am 
Hors-ligne
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : mar. oct. 20, 2015 14:14 pm
Messages : 7
Hello Fred,

Many thanks for your welcome to this website.

I will look through my late fathers photos and documents to see if I can find more information for this website.

My father, Guardsman Norman Lund, served with the Second Battalion, Grenadier Guards which was part of the Guards Armoured Division. They arrived in France six days after D Day and were involved in the liberation of Caen, Amiens and Albert and many other French towns. They went on to liberate Brussels and are well known for the liberation of Nijmegen in Holland and the taking of the road bridge over the Waal in Nijmegen. They were then tasked to push on to Arnhem to relieve the Allied parachutists who had taken the town, but after suffering heavy losses on the exposed Dutch roads, they failed to reach the parachutists who were mostly killed or taken prisoner.

My father ended the war near Hamburg in Germany. After the German surrender he volunteered to fight the Japanese and was in a ship on his way to Asia when the Japanese surrendered also, and the Grenadier Guards were diverted to Palestine, where he served until the British left in 1948. He then joined the police in our hometown of Bolton, Lancashire, England. He later joined the British Colonial Police and served in the Cyprus Police and Nyasaland Police, in Central Africa. Our family then moved to South Africa where my brother served in the South African army in the 1970's and I served in the South African Air Force. I now live in Perth, Australia. My father passed away in South Africa in 2011.

An interesting aside is that whilst my father served in the area of the Somme in WW2, my grandfather also served on the Somme with the Scottish Rifles in WW1. They both spent time in the vicinity of Albert. My grandfather went on to win the Distinguished Conduct Medal for bravery during the Battle of Passchendaele.


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mer. nov. 04, 2015 8:39 am 
Hors-ligne
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : mar. oct. 20, 2015 14:14 pm
Messages : 7
Bonjour Somme,

Many thanks for your comments.

When I was in Bonnay for the Mayoral reception held for my father, a citizen of Bonnay showed me many photos taken in the village during the time my father was there. He had pictures of the three destroyed Sherman tanks as well as the graves of the two soldiers killed, Guardsmen Joseph Bryant (2614577) and Edward Sault (2619101) killed in Bonnay on 31 August 1944. Their bodies were later moved to London Cemetery Extension, Highwood, Longueval. Both men of Second Battalion, Grenadier Guards, Guards Armoured Division. The gentleman from Bonnay also had pictures of my father and several of his comrades who stayed in Bonnay/Heilly for about a week.

To the best of my recollection, my father described the liberation of Bonnay as follows : His troop of Sherman tanks entered the village and noticed no civilians in the streets. They expected an attack so stopped their tanks to await infantry support. Whilst the tanks were stationery they noticed movement and unfortunately, by mistake, shot and killed an elderly woman, a citizen of Bonnay. Shortly afterwards they noticed a German motorcycle and sidecar with machine gun approaching the village. They shot and killed both German soldiers in the motor cycle and side car. They then proceeded to the last buildings in the village, on the road to Albert, where they stopped. Shortly afterwards the order was given to advance, and they left the cover of the buildings. It was then that three tanks were hit by only three perfectly aimed shots from a German 88mm gun. Each shot hit a different tank in almost the same position close to where the driver sits. Both Sault and Bryant were tank drivers. Both were old soldiers aged in their late twenties. Bryant was married and Sault engaged to be married. They were both in their late twenties. The remaining tanks immediately reversed back behind the towns buildings and awaited infantry support. The badly wounded men were taken away by ambulance. Those not severely wounded were left behind in Bonnay.

The next morning, after the infantry confirmed there were no enemy in the hills overlooking the town, the remaining tanks were ordered to continue their advance to Albert. My fathers tank was now in front and was destroyed near Albert. Lieutenant Steurton being the only serious casualty. My father and the rest of his crew walked back to Heilly/Bonnay. The photo used as my profile picture was taken in Heilly on 4 September 1944. My father is standing next to a boy from Heilly, who was the brother of a girl my father became friendly with in the town, by the name of Marcelle. The people in Bonnay advised us that this boy died many years before our visit in April 2000. His sister, Marcelle, had married an Englishman and was still living in England at that time. An amusing incident in 1948 happened on the day my father married my mother. A telegram arrived from Marcelle saying that she had arrived in England to complete a Nursing course and asking if she could meet my father. My mother often joked about this telegram which severely embarrassed my father.

I would very much like to see any pictures that you have of the British forces during the liberation of Corbie/Bonnay/Heilly/Albert.

I will provide more information and hopefully some pictures shortly.


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mer. nov. 04, 2015 9:18 am 
Hors-ligne

Inscription : sam. oct. 17, 2015 23:06 pm
Messages : 90
Bonjour, que tout cela est intéressant ! Frédéric et somme40, vous n'avez pas à rougir de votre anglais !

Hi Wayne ! Glad to meet you on this website. Your father's story is very interesting, very telling and above all really very moving you know. I have just a question... Did your father come to Beauvais (Oise) ?

Regards.

Loustic


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mer. nov. 04, 2015 10:59 am 
Hors-ligne

Inscription : dim. sept. 16, 2012 10:06 am
Messages : 164
Hi Wayne.
Very exiting effectively. :wink:
I can send you by mail (adress on mp) just one photo with this jeep and the first english mortocycle man enter in the Heilly village for the liberation.
May be your father was here and Marcelle ? I'm not sure.
I'll enquiry the rarely older people in the village about this boy and this sister.
All the photos are the liberation of the village with many citizen people and ostentrupp prisoners.
The photograph said me that a ostruppen horse convoy was buried by attack airplane next after the village on the road of Heilly to Ribemont Sur Ancre. If you have informations of this evennement...

I bounce to your grand father who fight in the first war near Albert. Incredible. Another generation mans in a similar war in the same land...
To bounce also for your comments about your family : :D You're warriors ! Definitely your ancestors came to the battle of Crecy in the Somme in 1346


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mer. nov. 04, 2015 18:46 pm 
Hors-ligne
Site Admin
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : jeu. sept. 27, 2007 21:28 pm
Messages : 3330
Loustic a écrit :
Bonjour, que tout cela est intéressant ! Frédéric et somme40, vous n'avez pas à rougir de votre anglais !
...
Loustic


Pourquoi rougirais-je de mon anglais ? 8)

_________________
Frédéric - co-administrateur du site et forum "Picardie 1939 - 1945"
Président association "Picardie 1939 - 1945"


Haut
   
MessagePublié : mer. nov. 04, 2015 19:12 pm 
Hors-ligne

Inscription : sam. oct. 17, 2015 23:06 pm
Messages : 90
Yes indeed... why... ? :wink:

Loustic


Haut
   
MessagePublié : jeu. nov. 05, 2015 7:07 am 
Hors-ligne
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : mar. oct. 20, 2015 14:14 pm
Messages : 7
Hello Loustic,

"Did your father come to Beauvais (Oise) ?"

I don't remember him ever mentioning the town but I read in my fathers book "The Grenadier Guards in the War of 1939 to 1945" that his regiment helped liberate the town, so he may have been there. He spent a week or so on the road between Vire and Vassey, which I know is quite far away from Beauvais. The Grenadiers were there as support if the Germans broke out of Caen. When we drove this road in 2000 he could remember exactly where his tank was situated and pointed out a farm where the occupants supplied them with eggs and meat. He had plentiful praise for the people of France, who he said had a very brave and well supported resistance (Maquis?) compared to the Dutch and Belgians.


Haut
   
MessagePublié : jeu. nov. 05, 2015 19:46 pm 
Hors-ligne
Site Admin
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : jeu. sept. 27, 2007 21:28 pm
Messages : 3330
Wayne a écrit :
Hello Loustic,

"Did your father come to Beauvais (Oise) ?"

I don't remember him ever mentioning the town but I read in my fathers book "The Grenadier Guards in the War of 1939 to 1945" that his regiment helped liberate the town, so he may have been there. He spent a week or so on the road between Vire and Vassey, which I know is quite far away from Beauvais. The Grenadiers were there as support if the Germans broke out of Caen. When we drove this road in 2000 he could remember exactly where his tank was situated and pointed out a farm where the occupants supplied them with eggs and meat. He had plentiful praise for the people of France, who he said had a very brave and well supported resistance (Maquis?) compared to the Dutch and Belgians.


hi Wayne,

you talked about your father's book !? did he write a book after the war or it's a kind of war book ?

regards
Fred

_________________
Frédéric - co-administrateur du site et forum "Picardie 1939 - 1945"
Président association "Picardie 1939 - 1945"


Haut
   
MessagePublié : ven. nov. 06, 2015 9:25 am 
Hors-ligne
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : mar. oct. 20, 2015 14:14 pm
Messages : 7
Somme 40,

This vehicle was part of the 2nd Survey Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery.

The regiment assisted the Guards Armoured Division.

Regimental History :

The first deployment was made north of Caen on 11 Jul 44, and from then until V.E. Day the unit was never out of action. The Regiment saw action at Caen, Falaise, Boulougne, Calais, Dunkirk, the Scheldt Estuary, Nijmegen, Reichswald, etc. "Ubique" indeed!
During these operations, survey, sound ranging and flash spotting troops carried out their special functions, being joined later by mortar locating sections. In addition, the Regiment performed many unusual tasks: for example, the directional wireless beams and the search lights, which guided the tanks and armoured personnel carriers in the breakthrough down the Caen-Falaise road were surveyed in by the Regiment. Furthermore, early in November, the Regiment was the first to put troops over the border into Germany.
During all these operations the Regiment served with all five Canadian Divisions, many famous British Divisions (including the 51st Highland, the Guards armoured Division, as well as with U.S.A. and Polish formations.


Pièces jointes :
Description du fichier : Somme 40

This vehicle was attached to the 2nd Survey Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 4.16.20 pm.png
Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 4.16.20 pm.png [ 137.56 Kio | Consulté 1995 fois ]
Haut
   
Afficher les messages publiés depuis :  Trier par  
Publier un nouveau sujet  Répondre au sujet  [ 35 messages ]  Atteindre la page Précédent 1 2 3 Suivant

Le fuseau horaire est réglé sur UTC+01:00


Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 0 invité


Vous ne pouvez pas publier de nouveaux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas éditer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas supprimer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas transférer de pièces jointes dans ce forum

Rechercher :
Atteindre :  
cron
(c)picardie-1939-1945.org